Conference-DVDs arrived

Jeffrey Massung massung at gmail.com
Thu Feb 25 20:05:49 CST 2010


On Feb 25, 2010, at 6:34 PM, Kay C Lan wrote:

> On Fri, Feb 26, 2010 at 3:47 AM, Richmond Mathewson
> <richmondmathewson at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> I learnt something extremely useful when I was at Carbondale from my MA
>> supervisor: NEVER, NEVER,
>> under any circumstances let your personal problems interfere with your
>> professional obligations,
>> AND, NEVER use them as an excuse for failing in any professional
>> obligations.
>> 
> 
> His name wasn't Morely was it?
> 
> So let me get this straight, when my son was 3 he was bitten by a
> bamboo snake (can be lethal to children) and lay dying in a hospital
> emergency room and I was due to catch a flight to Tokyo for business
> and you're saying I should have left him there and gone - actually
> that's exactly how 'the company' reacted, so I guess i now know there
> are more people in the world who think like that:-(

While some people may think one choice is correct and the other isn't, that certainly isn't the case. To each his/her own. It's a matter of personal priorities. For myself, family comes above all else; there's always another job or business opportunity around the corner, but I only have one daughter, and she's the pride of my life.

That said, I think the premise is that you can't have your cake and eat it, too. Once you've made a choice, be prepared to accept the consequences of it. With the example of your son, I know I would have stayed with him (in your shoes), but had I been told the next day I was fired, I'd have been equally alright with that (and honestly, who would want to work for such a company anyway?).

Every customer - and more importantly - potential customers - aren't going to be aware of personal problems. And, frankly, they won't care most of the time. It's sad that often times business isn't more personal. A personal relationship between supplier and customer can add a lot. But, for many customers, business (and time) is strictly about money. Their priorities won't match yours. That's okay. Just be willing to accept the fallout.

Jeff M.


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