New rendering testing

Joe Lewis Wilkins pepetoo at cox.net
Mon Oct 17 17:48:43 CDT 2011


Alex:

When I first got involved with Revolution I had hoped that it would just be an up-todate HC; but, alas, it began to get too complicated for the average hobbyist, so many of the HC users just never came aboard. I don't blame them. I was very close to being one who didn't myself. Over the years I have done some pretty remarkable things with HC. I really neither needed nor wanted the extensions that eventually became LiveCode. I believe that a totally bug-free Revolution 1.x could have become a major hit with all of the educators, and wouldn't have had to be so costly. Do I hear a few Amens? 

Joe Wilkins

On Oct 17, 2011, at 3:27 PM, Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> Hi Joe and Jim,
> 
> Joe, many thanks for your kind words!
> I always hope that my scripting experiments
> would do more good than harm and at least
> should be useful to show the Do's and Don'ts
> on the specific topics that I worked with.
> 
> 
> James Hurley wrote:
>> 
>> [snip]
>> Kevin and I discussed the possibility of implementing it as part of Run
>> Rev.
>> They were more interesting in education at the time.
>> 
> 
> Yes, I hope to see more Livecode and LOGO teaching
> in the future. In LOGO, the teacher is fundamental to
> produce extraordinary results. 
> The greatest teaching ideas are widely celebrated and
> quickly forgotten... almost like a ritual.
> In my eyes, the longer I look into the Education field 
> this become more and more paradoxical. Almost like a
> Lewis Carroll tale, with the complete cast of characters.
> 
> I am sure that Livecode is a resounding sucess when used
> to teach Introduction to Computer Programming.
> At least for me, this computer language provided the
> confidence to try many ideas that I would not even dare to. 
> Yes, this computer language inspire confidence.
> Does every computer language instill this 
> in their users/developers?
> 
> Why Livecode teaching is not more extended, as expected, 
> in the English speaking world? My best guess is that
> everyone that look at Livecode, believe that it's a
> neat idea... and their next question is:
> Is this endorsed, recommended and approved by the
> powers that be in education???
> This is exactly the moment where you understand
> that more and more people in the education field 
> are not, and do not pretend to be leaders, but followers...
> 
> Sad, but true...
> 
> 
> James Hurley wrote:
>> 
>> I'm not sure where that file you found came from, but it is not very
>> readable.
>> I have a clean version I will send you separately. Do not share it with
>> others
>> at this time. I have retitled (and did some rewriting of)  the Logo
>> Physics book
>> to "Programming for Science Students." I think that is the appropriate
>> market
>> --if one exists at all.
>> 
> 
> Received. Many Thanks! :-)
> 
> 
> James Hurley wrote:
>> 
>> [snip]
>> Unfortunately I am out of touch with this market now and so have
>> nothing for you about current applications, if any. Trouble is perception.
>> It is perceived as a tool for children, a perception quickly dispelled in
>> Turtle Geometry by Abelson and diSessa. The last chapter is titled:
>> Curved Geometry and General Relativity. 
>> 
> 
> Interesting enough, in this page:
> http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7287
> there is a surprising error:
> Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and
> Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
> 
> Class of 1922!!! Extraordinary, to say the least. :-)
> 
> By the way, your stack:
> http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithSpin.rev
> is the only game that I play with some frecuency.
> 
> Thanks again, Jim



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