text speeds are good

Dave Cragg dave.cragg at lacscentre.co.uk
Sun Mar 16 15:48:17 EDT 2008


On 16 Mar 2008, at 18:46, Colin Holgate wrote:


>
> filltext();
> function filltext() {
> 	var d1:Date = new Date();
> 	var ms:int = d1.getTime();
> 	var t:String = "";
> 	var w:String;
> 	for (var i = 0; i<300000; i++) {
> 		t += "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaab";
> 	}
> 	var tarray:Array = t.split("ab");
> 	for (i = 0; i<tarray.length; i++) {
> 		w = tarray[i];
> 	}
> 	var d2:Date = new Date();
> 	var nms:int = d2.getTime();
> 	trace(nms - ms, t.length);
> }

As I said, I used a regEx delimiter for the split. The following is  
what I think is the equivalent of Rev's "each word" structure.

var d1:Date = new Date();
var ms:int = d1.getTime();
var t:String = "";
var w:String;
var rx:RegExp = /\s/;
for (var i:int = 0; i<300000; i++) {
	t += "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ";
}

var tarray:Array = t.split(rx);
for (i = 0; i<tarray.length; i++) {
	w = tarray[i];
}
var d2:Date = new Date();
var nms:int = d2.getTime();
trace(nms - ms, t.length);

On my machine, it's about 10 times slower than using a simple string  
as the delimiter.

> In any case, I was trying to praise Rev's handling of something  
> that can be potentially slow, and not trying to find the fastest  
> way that it could be done.

I know. And I was interested in your data.  But you did make the  
statement "Rev isn't anywhere near as fast as AS3 at handling text  
strings" which could have been misinterpreted. I just wanted to point  
out that it might depend on what you are doing.

Cheers
Dave




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