Linux preferences

Andre Garzia soapdog at mac.com
Thu May 11 23:44:00 EDT 2006


Richard,

this also striked me when I first noticed that. But this is the  
standard behaviour, not only for user apps but also for system level  
apps. Just to a "ls -a" in your home folder... even MacOS X uses this  
for many *NIX ported apps...

dot files are no exactly hidden, you can access them as normal files,  
they are just hidden from normal "ls" output...

and yes Richard, I really hate this "standard". For example standard  
place for placing terminal preference commands and configuration on  
MacOS X is .bashrc which does not appear in Finder unless you  
explicity tell Finder to display hidden files... ARGH!!!!!

Andre


On May 12, 2006, at 12:27 AM, Richard Gaskin wrote:

> Andre Garzia wrote:
>
>> On May 11, 2006, at 9:44 PM, Sarah Reichelt wrote:
>>
>>> Sorry, I feel I've asked this before, but I can't find the answer in
>>> the archives.
>>>
>>> Where do Linux users expect preferences to be saved?
>>>
>>> In Macs I use the specialFolderPath("Preferences").
>>> In Windows I use specialFolderPath(26).
>>>
>>> What is the Linux equivalent?
>>
>> they expect it to be saved in their home folder ($HOME or ~) with a
>> name beggining with a "." (so that it be hidden) like:
>>
>> .mySweetPrefsFile
>>
>> so you can use URL "file:~/.mySweetPrefs"
>
> They expect files to be concealed?
>
> Personally I don't trust apps that hide things from me, and I'm very
> surprised that the uber gurus who use Linux actually prefer hidden  
> files.
>
>
> --
>  Richard Gaskin
>  Managing Editor, revJournal
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