[OT] Weighted distribution of Numbers

Ralph DiMola rdimola at evergreeninfo.net
Sun Aug 4 15:38:31 EDT 2019


Dar,

Thanks for looking at this...

These numbers are quality ratings. The raw numbers range from 0 to a max of
800 or so. The customer wants to see a rating from 0-100 so I normalize them
into a range of 0 to 100 where the raw 0 is 0 and the raw 800 is 100. This
works perfectly. When looking at the resulting 0-100 ratings is where they
see the distribution anomalies. They would like to see the top numbers(say
from 94 to 100) to go to 100 and then the original 93 to be 99 and the
original 90 to be 97 or so. And also smooth out any gaps in the distribution
so there for example if there are almost no numbers in the 40s to bump up
the 30s a little and bump down the 50s a little. I'm sure there's an actual
name for doing this in the statistician's world but I don't know what it is.

Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdimola at evergreeninfo.net
Phone: 518-636-3998 Ex:11
Cell: 518-796-9332


-----Original Message-----
From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-bounces at lists.runrev.com] On Behalf
Of Dar Scott Consulting via use-livecode
Sent: Sunday, August 04, 2019 3:03 PM
To: How to use LiveCode
Cc: Dar Scott Consulting
Subject: Re: [OT] Weighted distribution of Numbers

Just to clarify... Is this right?

The max of the raw numbers maps to 100.
The min of the raw numbers maps to 0. (Or is it 0 maps to 0?) The middle
number maps to something like 70. (Or is it half of the max maps to 70?) The
mapping is smooth.

Where 70 might be something else.

> On Aug 4, 2019, at 12:49 PM, Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
<use-livecode at lists.runrev.com> wrote:
> 
> I have a set of raw numbers(6,000 of them from 0 to 800 or so). It was 
> easy to normalize these numbers from 0 to 100. But as I look at the 
> results I see that there is one at to top(100) and a few in the 90s 
> and many more in the 70s and 80s. I need to make these numbers more 
> evenly distributed and weighted towards the top(so the top few are 
> 100) based on the current distribution of the raw numbers. I'm not a 
> math whiz and not afraid to admit that going beyond linier equations 
> is way over my head. From some searches I see the some sort of 
> nonlinear regression is in order(I think)? Or a apply a log (like an 
> audio log taper of a potentiometer)? I don't know... Can anyone point me
in the in the right direction?
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Ralph DiMola
> IT Director
> Evergreen Information Services
> rdimola at evergreeninfo.net
> 
> 
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