[OT] Copyrighting games?

Rick Harrison harrison at all-auctions.com
Wed Aug 19 13:47:11 EDT 2015


Hi Richmond & Roger,

You are referring to some kind of DRM (Digital Rights Management).  While
in theory it sounds great, very often products that do this are boycotted
by users who find out about it, and it can ruin one's product sales.

Years ago I had a shareware game that I asked people to register for
when trying out the game so that when it came time for them to actually
purchase the product if they liked it, it would make the process easy and
painless.  It also provided me with information on how many people downloaded
the product and used it.  It seemed like a great idea at the time.  All I got
were complaints about how I was invading their privacy by asking them to
register to use my free to try game.  Over 600 people downloaded the game
and played it.  Only 1 of them was honest enough to actually pay me $5.00
for what he described as an absolutely fantastic game which was way ahead
of it’s time.

You will probably want to produce some prototype physical games on your
own if possible.  You could consider 3-D printing some of your plastic parts etc.
Find a manufacturer who can ramp up your production if you need it.  Just get
the costs figured out for this first, so you’ll know what you are up against.

Patenting is not an inexpensive process.  Once you have a successful patent
you will have to be prepared to defend it with lots of cash for lawyers fees.
This is why many products are released with “Patent Pending” on them which
means a patent application has been filed but not yet granted so the product
was able to be rushed to market before any copycats got into the act.

Copyright is easiest and you should see how well your electronic software 
sales go first before attempting to sell a physical board game version as
that will be way more expensive to manage and produce.

Good luck with your product!

Rick

> On Aug 19, 2015, at 12:56 PM, Roger Eller <roger.e.eller at sealedair.com> wrote:
> 
> You could have your software log first-time app launches to a LC server
> database just to inform you that it has been installed somewhere, and
> include some kind of trace code to the purchaser.  When you see 1000+
> launches from different IP Addresses, you'll know it has gotten out into
> the wilderness (the interwebs).
> 
> 
> On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 12:49 PM, Richmond <richmondmathewson at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> 
>> On 19/08/15 19:39, Peter TB Brett wrote:
>> 
>>> On 2015-08-19 18:25, Richmond wrote:
>>> 
>>>> I have recently invented a tiling game that can be produced as a
>>>> physical game and as a computer game.
>>>> This involved a lot of thought and a lot of work, and as a result I
>>>> would like to try and make some money
>>>> out of it rather than just "give it to the world".
>>>> 
>>>> However, never having copyrighted anything except a book in 1985, I
>>>> don't know how to go about this.
>>>> 
>>>> My main concern would be, initially at least, within the European
>>>> Community.
>>>> 
>>>> I would be grateful for any advice anyone can give me.
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> Since quite a long time ago now, every creative work automatically has
>>> copyright protection from the moment of creation -- and, by treaty, this
>>> protection extends worldwide.
>>> 
>>> There is no need to register your copyright any more in order to receive
>>> protection (although it may assist in enforcement).
>>> 
>>> On the other hand, whether you have copyright on something and whether
>>> you can make money out of it are usually uncorrelated.
>>> 
>> 
>> Ha, Ha, Ha . . . of course.
>> 
>> However, before I roll along to the local plastic moulding factory I want
>> to try to ensure that the owner of the factory doesn't
>> merrily steal my product or start selling copies out the back door.
>> 
>> I am tempted to register here: https://www.workscopyright.com/ as it is
>> quick and inexpensive.
>> 
>> Money is as money does, and I am notoriously bad with money. But I am
>> aware that if I want to *try* and sell my product rather
>> than just give it away (at which point somebody else can make money from
>> my bright idea) I need a bit of what Gene Wilder was talking about
>> in the first version of /Charlie and the Chocolate Factory/.
>> 
>> Richmond.
>> 
>> 
>>>                                    Peter
>>> 
>>> 
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