community vs commercial for internal distribution of iOS apps

Mark Wilcox m_p_wilcox at yahoo.co.uk
Tue Aug 20 16:28:59 CEST 2013


It's distribution not use that counts in the GPL. If you put the download behind a login then you could possibly argue that the distribution was entirely internal, however, students are not generally under the control of an organisation in the same way that employees are - a student could legitimately argue that you gave them the binary, therefore you have to give them the source code too. For a company with an internal distribution, employees or sub-contractors are unlikely to raise the same objection. Even if you did make source code available internally, you can contractually prevent employees and sub-contractors from distributing it further, whatever the license says. With students I don't think that's the case.

Note that the GPL never forces you to publish your source code publicly when distribution is limited, just that everyone who gets the binary also gets the source and is free to pass it on to others.


________________________________
 From: Terry Judd <terry.judd at unimelb.edu.au>
To: How to use LiveCode <use-livecode at lists.runrev.com> 
Sent: Tuesday, 20 August 2013, 13:56
Subject: Re: community vs commercial for internal distribution of iOS apps
 



On 20/08/2013, at 8:31 PM, "Richmond" <richmondmathewson at gmail.com> wrote:

> On 08/20/2013 06:32 AM, Terry Judd wrote:
>> I've been looking at the FAQs, and in particular this question...
>> 
>> Can you give me some examples of where I do and don't need a commercial license?
>> 
>> ... and I'm still not exactly clear on where I stand.
>> 
>> My situation is that I am distributing apps to students within my institution using an iOS Enterprise Developer license. The apps are hosted on one of our sites and are can be downloaded by anyone but they will only work for our students as they require users to logon securely through the uni's authentication system. I've been distributing these up to now using a commercial license but I'm wondering whether this is necessary. The pertinent question seems to be - do I need to distribute the source code to students to be within the terms of the community license?
> 
> I have a feeling that you have to make the source code available NOT only to the students in your institution, but to anyone who downloads your apps; whether they have a logon account or not.
> 
I suspect you're right.

> This means that other institutions could pinch your app.
> 
> If this fusses you, you have to buy the commercial version.

I'm about to renew anyway but was curious about what my obligations were.

Cheers,

Terry...
> 
> Richmond.
> 
>> Terry...
>> 
>> Dr Terry Judd
>> Senior Lecturer in Medical Education
>> Medical Education Unit
>> Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
>> The University of Melbourne
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
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