Three Years of Rev (was RE: Check out Jerry's new videos)

Lynn Fredricks lfredricks at proactive-intl.com
Sat May 8 20:29:07 EDT 2010


> Lynn, we havwebeen a huge difference of opinion.  Huge!  
> Please plot runrev into the future as you see it.  Then tell 
> us why you see it that way and the motivations that support 
> this opinion.

There's wishful thinking and then there's my perspective on the company and
the product it makes.

What would *I* do, over the next three years (and if my end game doesn't
occur in that time)?

- Focus on mobile targets (Android, Netbooks, try to weasel a deal with MS
for Windows Phone/XNA/Xbox, don't depend on Apple, but reciprocate any love
shown)
- Explore ways to take advantage of hardware acceleration for graphics and
have a 64 bit strategy
- Strongly support 1-2 major Linuxes and make Linux only compilation free
- Rev/PHP like System with a Web Interface builder/translator; Application
Server
- Improve back end code so that its easier to generate new platform sources
with the least amount of trouble
- Come up with a way to more easily "package" various web APIs and put that
into the Enterprise product
- Really good version control for Enterprise
- Improve efficiency/performance of component/External usage
- Make it easier for third parties to put in various wizards, etc into the
Rev interface without messing it up

The challenge with selling development tools is that you make a terribly
complex product that is expensive to support and has a small potential user
base. So finding ways to lower support costs and increasing the potential
user base suggests a few strategies.

Runrev has to be profitable to keep developing, and the more "hot" platforms
you have, the more dollar signs will appear in the eyes of potential
customers. Android/Tablets/Netbooks/Phones are begging for a good way to get
vertical applications on them.

Back end coding has to go through iterative processes though to make sure it
becomes less and less problematic to add new targets. I don't know what the
situation is with the Rev code, but I know its something we've done really
successfully at Paradigma. Id expect Rev to be much, much more complicated. 

As this gets better, code translation as you suggest may be a lot less
trouble than it probably is right now to implement, and therefore a strategy
that doesn't require betting the company on to try (later).

You get Linux to pay for itself through the cross compilation system. 

A free Linux version that works well also is a great option for the
educational market and academics and can be THE educational initiative.
That's a long term investment but if done right can push a bit of Java out
of our education system. Learners become buyers, advocates/influencers, etc.
Team up with other companies that are focused on Linux in education. Yes, Id
give some love to Windows and Mac OS for academics but that's not where I
would set my mark. Id dedicate a person hired *specifically* for this.

An Application Server system requires a lot of thought and investment, both
for planning development and its relationship to "rev", and also on planning
how to deal with market acceptance. This is a good way though for Rev to
generate revenue on a per deployment basis.

A lot of these may sound sort of familiar ;-)

Best regards,

Lynn Fredricks
President
Paradigma Software
http://www.paradigmasoft.com

Valentina SQL Server: The Ultra-fast, Royalty Free Database Server 



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lynn Fredricks <lfredricks at proactive-intl.com>
> Sent: Saturday, May 08, 2010 2:55 PM
> To: 'How to use Revolution' <use-revolution at lists.runrev.com>
> Subject: RE: Check out Jerry's new videos
> 
> > resources.  It would not be trivial to get runrev to export 
> C source.  
> > But it would be invaluable to users and to the longevity 
> and reach of 
> > the runrev product and market.
> 
> It would definitely have an effect, but it may not be the 
> best use of Rev resources. AFAIK, there are multiple bits of 
> Rev in Rev and also in C/C++ precompiled chunks that go into 
> a stack. I think it would be a nightmare sorting all that out 
> on top of just a plain code generator.
> 
> I believe there was a REALbasic-to-C or C++ generator 
> produced by a third party, but I believe it flopped as a product.
> 
> If you are working in artificial intelligence, you'd probably 
> benefit from some of your project being compiled as an external.
> 
> Best regards,
> 
> Lynn Fredricks
> President
> Paradigma Software
> http://www.paradigmasoft.com
> 
> Valentina SQL Server: The Ultra-fast, Royalty Free Database Server 
> 
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