App deployment on Windows

Richmond richmondmathewson at gmail.com
Sat Jul 3 16:16:26 EDT 2010


On 07/03/2010 10:27 PM, stephen barncard wrote:
> but you are the admin.
>
> On 3 July 2010 11:31, Richmond<richmondmathewson at gmail.com>  wrote:
>    
>> On 07/03/2010 08:41 PM, charles61 wrote:
>>      
>>> Richmond
>>>
>>> I am concern about the location of the installation because of the
>>> virtualization that Vista and Windows 7 employs.
>>>
>>> Charles Szasz
>>> cszasz at mac.com
>>>        
>> Thanks for explaining that.
>>
>> However: having, temporarily, installed RunRev on a machine running Vista;
>> built a standalone
>> (on the desktop) and having run the standalone directly from where it was
>> built, I can say that
>> everything worked in an extremely unproblematic fashion.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>>      

Err . . . Yes; but I (probably naively) assumed that if you are 
marketing software
the Admin person would be the one who was installing it and setting the 
user privileges
to it.

Certainly, when I ran a Mac lab at St Andrews we had "merry hell" with 
Chinese and Japanese
students downloading Chinese and Japanese input-capable chat clients 
(the Macs were for
academic purposes) until we locked-down software install to the admin; 
although, later
(after one particularly intelligent student got hold of a Mac boot disk) 
we went for doing a
boot from a cloned disk image.

I seem to remember a similar situation at SIU Carbondale; the chap who 
was in charge of
all the computers there, Dallas Service

[ http://www.lib.siu.edu/departments/iss/contactpanel  what a great guy]

had a bet with me that I couldn't get through the 'At Ease' set up on 
the Library Macs;
it took a floppy and a brain about 3 minutes. Mind you, he was happy it 
was me rather
than the "get into a system and trash it" brigade.

Were I to be in a similar situation again I would be thoroughly 
dictatorial with regard to a
software policy (especially with such virus-prones systems as Microsoft 
trots out). Luckily
my school features PCs running Linux with disconnected CD drives and 
backward-facing
USB ports so that even the craftier Primary school children cannot 
install 'Battle for Wesnoth'
should they even know how to.



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